Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

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Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone

Received: Nov. 29, 2023    Accepted: Jan. 03, 2024    Published: Feb. 01, 2024
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Abstract

Expanding electricity access and energy in rural areas is a central policy issue in Ethiopia. The hydropower plant is one of the solutions to the shortage of electric energy in remote rural areas. This research deals with Amerti-Nashe dam-induced rural electrification in western Ethiopia. The main objectives of this study were to investigate the rural electrification impact of small dams on local communities in Ethiopia in the case of the Ameri Nashi dams. The study collected primary data from a sample of 316 households that live in the vicinity of the dam. Statistical analyses such as the Chi-square test, paired t-test, and binary logistics model were performed to determine differences in energy distribution, use of energy before and after the dam project, energy adoption status, challenges for households to adopt electric energy, and energy impacts. The result of the research shows that more than half of the population was not provided energy from the nearby Ameri-Nashe and Fincha dams, and instead, the majority of the population of the zone depends on traditional fuel as a source of energy. There was a disparity in the distribution of electric energy among the sample households due to different factors like distance from the grid line, the unaffordable cost of adoption, and grid-based electric energy.

DOI 10.11648/jeece.20240901.11
Published in Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering ( Volume 9, Issue 1, April 2024 )
Page(s) 1-11
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Hydropower Plant, Rural Electrification, Socio-Economic Impact, Horo Gudru

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    Soressa, T., Gebre-Egziabher, T. (2024). Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone. Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering, 9(1), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.11648/jeece.20240901.11

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    Soressa, T.; Gebre-Egziabher, T. Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone. J. Energy Environ. Chem. Eng. 2024, 9(1), 1-11. doi: 10.11648/jeece.20240901.11

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    AMA Style

    Soressa T, Gebre-Egziabher T. Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone. J Energy Environ Chem Eng. 2024;9(1):1-11. doi: 10.11648/jeece.20240901.11

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  • @article{10.11648/jeece.20240901.11,
      author = {Temesgen Soressa and Tegegne Gebre-Egziabher},
      title = {Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone},
      journal = {Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering},
      volume = {9},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-11},
      doi = {10.11648/jeece.20240901.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/jeece.20240901.11},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.jeece.20240901.11},
      abstract = {Expanding electricity access and energy in rural areas is a central policy issue in Ethiopia. The hydropower plant is one of the solutions to the shortage of electric energy in remote rural areas. This research deals with Amerti-Nashe dam-induced rural electrification in western Ethiopia. The main objectives of this study were to investigate the rural electrification impact of small dams on local communities in Ethiopia in the case of the Ameri Nashi dams. The study collected primary data from a sample of 316 households that live in the vicinity of the dam. Statistical analyses such as the Chi-square test, paired t-test, and binary logistics model were performed to determine differences in energy distribution, use of energy before and after the dam project, energy adoption status, challenges for households to adopt electric energy, and energy impacts. The result of the research shows that more than half of the population was not provided energy from the nearby Ameri-Nashe and Fincha dams, and instead, the majority of the population of the zone depends on traditional fuel as a source of energy. There was a disparity in the distribution of electric energy among the sample households due to different factors like distance from the grid line, the unaffordable cost of adoption, and grid-based electric energy.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Hydropower Dam-Based Rural Electrification in Ethiopia: The Case of Amerti-Nashe Hydropower Plant, Horo Guduru Wollega Zone
    AU  - Temesgen Soressa
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    T2  - Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering
    JF  - Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering
    JO  - Journal of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering
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    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/jeece.20240901.11
    AB  - Expanding electricity access and energy in rural areas is a central policy issue in Ethiopia. The hydropower plant is one of the solutions to the shortage of electric energy in remote rural areas. This research deals with Amerti-Nashe dam-induced rural electrification in western Ethiopia. The main objectives of this study were to investigate the rural electrification impact of small dams on local communities in Ethiopia in the case of the Ameri Nashi dams. The study collected primary data from a sample of 316 households that live in the vicinity of the dam. Statistical analyses such as the Chi-square test, paired t-test, and binary logistics model were performed to determine differences in energy distribution, use of energy before and after the dam project, energy adoption status, challenges for households to adopt electric energy, and energy impacts. The result of the research shows that more than half of the population was not provided energy from the nearby Ameri-Nashe and Fincha dams, and instead, the majority of the population of the zone depends on traditional fuel as a source of energy. There was a disparity in the distribution of electric energy among the sample households due to different factors like distance from the grid line, the unaffordable cost of adoption, and grid-based electric energy.
    
    VL  - 9
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia

  • Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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